Original Research

Intracranial meningiomas at a tertiary hospital: Spectrum of MRI findings with histopathologic correlation

Jacobus A. Pienaar, Jacob Varghese
South African Journal of Radiology | Vol 28, No 1 | a2812 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajr.v28i1.2812 | © 2024 Jacobus A. Pienaar, Jacob Varghese | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 04 November 2023 | Published: 27 March 2024

About the author(s)

Jacobus A. Pienaar, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Klerksdorp/Tshepong Hospital Complex,Klerksdorp, South Africa
Jacob Varghese, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Klerksdorp/Tshepong Hospital Complex, Klerksdorp, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Intracranial meningiomas consist of a heterogenous group of histological subtypes, some of which are rare. Data that may play an important role in neurosurgical decision-making regarding the incidence and MRI features of these histological subtypes in the South African population groups, are lacking.

Objectives: This study aimed to assess the spectrum of MRI findings and histological subtypes of meningiomas in the South African context, with the goal of improving the paucity of literature on the topic.

Method: A retrospective review of the MRI features of 41 cases of histologically confirmed intracranial meningiomas was performed at a tertiary hospital level. Imaging features were audited and correlated with histological subtypes during statistical analysis.

Results: Eleven different histological subtypes of meningioma were encountered. World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I meningothelial meningiomas were the most common histological subgroup. Overall, meningiomas were found to be predominantly isointense to grey matter on T1-weighted imaging, irrespective of the histological subtype, with greater signal variability on T2-weighted imaging. Morphologies of specific subtypes are in keeping with the literature.

Conclusion: Analysis of this series of intracranial meningiomas did not demonstrate statistically significant differences in MRI features between histological subtypes to allow for accurate preoperative prediction of meningioma subtype or WHO grade. This highlights the importance of definitive histopathological diagnosis rather than over-reliance on presumed benign imaging features.

Contribution: This original research article discusses the impact of histological subtype on the MRI appearance of intracranial meningiomas, with the aim to improve the paucity of literature on the subject in the context of the South African population.


Keywords

neuroradiology; meningioma; intracranial neoplasm; magnetic resonance imaging; histology; neurosurgery.

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 4: Quality education

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