Review Article

Do you know the radiation dose your patients receive from your CT scanner?

Chris Welman, Savvas Andronikou, Ebrahim Kader
South African Journal of Radiology | Vol 5, No 2 | a1473 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajr.v5i2.1473 | © 2018 Chris Welman, Savvas Andronikou, Ebrahim Kader | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 16 July 2018 | Published: 31 October 2001

About the author(s)

Chris Welman, Department of Paediatric Radiology, University of Cape Town; and Institute of Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, South Africa
Savvas Andronikou, Department of Paediatric Radiology, University of Cape Town; and Institute of Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, South Africa
Ebrahim Kader, Department of Paediatric Radiology, University of Cape Town; and Institute of Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, South Africa

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Abstract

The number of computed tomography (CT) examinations and new indications for CT are increasing in frequency worldwide. While CT makes up only 4% of medical examinations, it might contribute as much as 40% of the total collective radiation dose to the population. Radiologists and referring clinicians should make sure that the CT examination is indicated. Doses can often approach or exceed levels known to increase the probability of cancer. This is especially relevant in children where dose reductions of up to 80% can be obtained by adjusting the exposure factors. The most important factors are decreased milliampere seconds (mAs) and increased pitch.

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